kid with arms outstretched and super-hero cap and mask on blue background for the BRAVE Research Center (formerly known as BRAVE Youth Lab)

Current Studies

Invitation to Participate in a Research Study on The impact of COVID-19 on Wisconsin youth and families

If you have a son or daughter between the ages of 6-17 and are living in the Wisconsin area, you are eligible for a research study conducted by the Department of Psychiatry. This study examines the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of Wisconsin families. Youth between the ages of 10 and 17 have the option to participate in the study as well. Study participation entails completing a set of surveys that will take up to one hour each at three different time points.

For each set of surveys that you or your child complete, you will be entered into a drawing to win a $100 e-gift card. Upon completion of each survey, you will be entered into a randomized drawing for a $100 Amazon gift card. This means that if you complete the baseline, one-month, and six-month follow-up surveys, you could win up to $300 in Amazon gift cards. The same opportunities will be given to your adolescent, should they also choose to participate.

Click here to review our additional information about the study and what to expect.

Click here to complete the surveys.

Invitation to Participate in a Research Study on Emotional Development

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

If you have a son or daughter between the ages of 10-16, he or she may qualify for a research study at the UW Department of Psychiatry. This study will examine brain function and other biological changes in healthy youth, as well as youth with anxiety, depression, or PTSD. Some participants may also have a history of trauma. We are looking for 10-16 year olds and their parent/guardian to participate in this research. Study activities include a clinical interview, MRI brain scan, questionnaires, and biological samples. This study does not involve any radiation, medication, or needles. Youth who have metal in their bodies, including braces, are not eligible to participate.

  • Your child will receive up to $1,030 for participation in all research activities over three years.
  • Click here to complete an online screening form. If you complete the full web screen, you will have the option to receive a $10 e-gift card.

Invitation to Participate in a Research Study on Parent-Child Learning  

Funded by the National Institutes of Health 

If you have a son or daughter between the ages of 10-14, he or she may qualify for a research study at the UW Department of Psychiatry. This study will examine how trauma and abuse affect brain development in youth, as well as social and biological functioning in families, to lead youth to resilience or vulnerability. Visits include a clinical assessment visit, three MRI brain scan visits completed over three consecutive days, and a final visit with computer games and other tasks.” Study activities include a clinical interview, MRI brain scan, questionnaires, and biological samples. This study does not involve any radiation, medication, or needles. Youth who have metal in their bodies, including braces, are not eligible to participate. 

  • Your child will receive up to $360 for participation in all five visits.  
  • Click to here complete an online screening form. If you complete the full web screen, you will have the option to receive a $10 e-gift card.

Why are we doing these studies?

Wisconsin Families and COVID-19 Study 

We are conducting this research to broadly examine the impact of COVID-19 related stressors and events on the mental health and well-being of families.  Certainly, there is enormous urgency in research limiting or preventing the debilitating and deadly respiratory common to individuals exposed to the coronavirus.  However, the effects of the virus expand well beyond the bodies of the infected to the minds of those affected by physical distancing measures, limited access to resources, loss of income, and government restrictions. Drawing from similar, historical public health emergency’s and catastrophic events, we may identify other secondary impacts of the pandemic on mental health, familial relationships, stress, and education.  As social researchers, we want to play a direct role in understanding these impacts so that our communities may rally together to help those who need it when they need it.

Emotional Development Study

The ability to identify and control our emotions is such an important skill in life. Adolescence is a time when the brain circuits regulating our emotions begin to strengthen. However, adolescence is also a time when a number of mental illnesses can arise in youth, including anxiety disorders, depression, and PTSD. We also know that having a history of significant adversity in one’s life can increase risk for developing one of these mental illnesses. But, we don’t know enough about how brain development is different in kids who have anxiety and depression, nor how childhood adversity might affect adolescent brain development. If we can better understand brain development in this critical phase of life, then hopefully we can develop better preventions and treatments down the road to help kids at risk for mental illness. We are looking for kids to help us out and participate in this three-year study to answer these questions. Specifically, we need healthy kids with no history of mental illness, as well as kids with anxiety, depression, or PTSD between the ages of 10-16. Please note that your child is not eligible if he/she is taking a medication for mental health problems, or if he/she has braces. If you would like to learn more, please click the banner below, or contact us by email or phone with specific questions. Thank you and we look forward to hearing from you! —The BRAVE Research Team

Parent-Child Learning Study

The purpose of this research study is to understand more about how youth learn from watching their caregiver and how that process may be different in youth that have been exposed to traumatic experiences or have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We are also interested in whether we can see these differences in the brain during the learning process. We are doing this research because we know that during adolescence, youth are able to learn from their parents about feelings of safety but don’t know very much about how this happens. For example, it could be that the safety learning process is affected by traumatic experiences or PTSD. We hope that any differences we find will help us improve the ability to diagnose these youth in the future and create better treatment options. Please note that your child is not eligible if he/she is taking a medication for mental health problems, or if he/she has braces. If you would like to learn more, please click the banner below, or contact us by email or phone with specific questions. Thank you and we look forward to hearing from you!The BRAVE Research Team 

Wisconsin Families and COVID-19 Study

Complete the surveys here!

Parent-Child Learning Study and Emotional Development Study

Learn more and Complete an Online Screening!

 

For more information, please call (608) 265-3610 or email braveyouthlab@psychiatry.wisc.edu